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What Do Menopausal Women Want? Research Reveals New Consumer Insights

09/17/2007
Findings from a nationwide survey reveal women expect more than a prescription when talking to their doctors about relief of menopausal symptoms. The research findings show women desire more proactive sharing with health professionals related to non-medicinal methods for addressing menopausal symptoms.

The survey, “Women & Menopause: A Look at Supplement Use,” provides new insights into menopausal women’s desires and behaviors related to their use of natural supplements for the relief of menopausal symptoms and their expectations of healthcare providers when discussing menopause.

The survey polled 1,258 women ages 40 to 55. Key findings among women surveyed include:A third try natural supplements for the relief of menopausal symptoms.A quarter name natural supplements as their “treatment of choice.”Nearly all who are using natural supplements for hot flashes say these are their “favorite method of treatment.”

Additionally, women entering menopause say they would like their healthcare professional to share information and help them find relief for menopausal symptoms. This includes:Discussions with doctors regarding natural treatments to help alleviate the symptoms they are experiencing.More proactive sharing with healthcare professionals related to non-medicinal methods for dealing with menopausal symptoms.

“These new findings indicate that women are looking to their healthcare professionals for comprehensive advice – they want to know about all the treatment options, including natural supplements,” said Mark Messina, Ph.D., soy researcher and adjunct professor of Nutrition at Loma Linda University in California.

The survey confirmed that menopausal women are in fact seeking advice from health professionals. Most cite any combination of obstetricians/gynecologists (48 percent), family physicians (38 percent) and/or general physicians (25 percent) as their menopause treatment advisors. Furthermore, 19 percent of women consult with their nurse practitioners, nurses and/or pharmacists regarding treatment options for menopausal symptoms.

“This research shows that women’s expectations are changing,” said Liza Pepple, product manager, ADM Natural Health & Nutrition. “Women are looking for their healthcare professionals to be as educated about natural alternatives for treating menopausal symptoms as they are about other options.”

The survey, sponsored by ADM, was fielded in March and April. The goal of the survey was to assess women’s awareness and use of natural supplements, including products containing soy, for the relief of menopausal symptoms.

ADM sponsored the survey as part of its ongoing soy isoflavone education campaign that aims to educate consumers and healthcare influencers on the benefits of soy isoflavones in easing hot flashes, a symptom of menopause, as well as to direct them to the most effective soy isoflavones. 

As part of its campaign, ADM conducted a critical review of the scientific literature relating to the efficacy of soy isoflavones in easing hot flashes (Menopause, Sept/Oct 2006). The critical review showed that isoflavone supplements that reflect the whole soybean isoflavone profile—the relative ratio of the three naturally-occurring isoflavones found in the soybean and containing more than 15 mg of genistein—appear to be effective.

For supplement manufacturers, ADM offers Novasoy® brand soy isoflavones, in the ratio found in whole soybeans, to provide relief from the severity and frequency of hot flashes associated with menopause. For more information on Novasoy brand soy isoflavones, visitwww.easingmenopause.com.

 

Contact:
ADM Media Relations
217/424-5413
media@adm.com